White

The white painting was an additional mood to the red and blue paintings, inspired by the white plants (Daucus carota – wild carrot) which grow around the schoolhouse and on the nearby fields. The colours used were: ultramarine blue, lemon yellow, golden yellow, and prussian blue. The painting was done in wet-in-wet and some details were added in dry in detail painting manner.

  • ultramarine came in and helped us through the fear of an empty page creating light and open environment for the plants to come in and shine, this time the blue knew exactly where to move and left umbrella like white shapes into the blue environment to shine.
  • lemon yellow came in and moved through the page following the footsteps of the blue giving an opportunity for very light greens to develop.
  • golden yellow came in and moved on the same path as lemon yellow making the greens warmer and warmer.
  • prussian blue came in and made up some leaves and stems mixing with yellows from the down part of the painting moving upwards to the light and giving some deepness to the greens
  • if wished – some tiny little something could be added by using red colours – some dots, some deep shadows etc. changing the greens toward the warmer tones and so on – if wished:))
  • now using the help of the little pieces of the natural sponge the upper parts of the plants-umbrellas were printed using the colours from the wet parts of the painting itself, dry watercolour pencils also can be grated on the flowers using sand paper, yellow pencil on the upper side and blue on the downside of the plant.

When the wet-in-wet painted surface has dried, it’s time to add some strokes to the plants.

  • mixing ultramarine and golden yellow nice green can be made for painting the stems and thin leaves etc.
  • Japanese painting style was introduced for painting the grass-soldiers to company beautiful ladies of wild carrots. Le Ball:))

Now some additional photos to inspire – your beautiful neighbourhood in Vac and a few pages from Estonian plant-study book for children.